Algebraic Term

algebraic term

Definition

A term that contains at least a literal number to represent a quantity is called an algebraic term.

The algebraic terms are single terms and can be formed by either a number or a literal or involvement of both in various mathematical forms.

Formation

The algebraic terms are formed in four distinct styles possibly to represent quantities algebraically.

1

Numbers

Every number is a symbol and used to represent a particular quantity. Hence, every real number is a basic example to algebraic terms.

Examples

$0$, $3$, $-8$, $\dfrac{4}{7}$, $-\dfrac{13}{6}$, $0.56$, $-3.15$, $\sqrt{13}$, $-\dfrac{2}{\sqrt[\displaystyle 3]{9}}$, $\ldots$

2

Symbols

Every symbol can be used to represent a quantity. Therefore, the symbols (can be either constants or variables) are also best examples of algebraic terms.

Examples

$a$, $p$, $\theta$, $\delta$, $c_o$, $\pi$, $\ldots$

3

Product

Numbers and symbols involve in multiplication to form single terms as their product to represent quantities. So, every algebraic term can be formed in product form by a number and at least one symbol.

Examples

$2x$, $-p^{\displaystyle 2}$, $7ab$, $-6m^{\displaystyle 2}n$, $0.5rs^{\displaystyle 2}t^{\displaystyle 3}$, $\Bigg(\dfrac{3}{7}\Bigg)cd^{\displaystyle 2}e^{\displaystyle 3}f^{\displaystyle 4}$, $\ldots$

4

Quotient

Numbers and symbols are also involved in division to form single terms as their quotient. Therefore, every algebraic term can be formed in quotient form by a number and at least one symbol.

Examples

$\dfrac{1}{d}$, $-\dfrac{a}{2b}$ , $\dfrac{p^{\displaystyle 2}}{q}$, $-\dfrac{m^{\displaystyle 4}}{n^{\displaystyle 3}r^{\displaystyle 6}}$, $\ldots$

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