Numerical factor of algebraic terms

A number that multiplies at least a literal to form an algebraic term is called the numerical factor of an algebraic term.

Introduction

An algebraic term is formed by the product of a number and at least a literal to represent a quantity in mathematical form. The number multiplies the literal in the algebraic term. Hence, it is known as a factor basically but it is a numeral. Therefore, it is known as a numerical factor.

Example

$6xy$ is an algebraic term.

In this algebraic term, the number $6$ and the literals $x$ and $y$ are multiplying each other to represent a quantity in product form. Mathematically, a multiplying element is called a factor in a term. Hence, all three of them are factors but $6$ is a factor in numerical form. Hence, the number $6$ is called a numerical factor.

More Examples

Look at the following examples to know how to determine a numerical factor in every algebraic term.

$(1)\,\,\,\,\,\,$ $-4a$
In this example, $-4$ is a number and multiplying the literal $a$. Hence, $-4$ is called a numerical factor.

$(2)\,\,\,\,\,\,$ $7b^2c$
$7$ is called the numerical factor.

$(3)\,\,\,\,\,\,$ $0.07gh^3$
$0.07$ is a decimal number. Hence, it is called the numerical factor.

$(4)\,\,\,\,\,\,$ $\dfrac{7e^4}{5}$
The algebraic term $\dfrac{7e^4}{5}$ can be written as $\dfrac{7}{5}e^4$. Therefore, $\dfrac{7}{5}$ is called the numerical factor.

$(5)\,\,\,\,\,\,$ $\dfrac{-j^4}{4k}$
The algebraic term can be written as $-\dfrac{1}{4} \times \dfrac{j^4}{k}$. Therefore, the numerical factor is $-\dfrac{1}{4}$.



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